Higher BMI Linked to Increased Risk of SARS-CoV-2

Researchers at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, USA, revealed that the spike-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies in obese people are negatively associated with body mass index (BMI) and serum levels of proinflammatory and metabolic markers of pulmonary inflammation. To arrive at the study findings, the researchers evaluated the effects of obesity on the secretion of SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies in the blood of COVID-19 patients. Serum levels of SARS-CoV-2 spike-specific IgG antibodies in lean and obese COVID-19 positive patients were measured using ELISA.

They found a higher rate of positivity in patients with a higher BMI. During hospital admission, those with higher BMI had severe respiratory symptoms such as cough, fever, shortness of breath, and hypoxia or low oxygen levels. The study findings also showed that spike-specific IgG antibodies in obese people are negatively linked to BMI and serum levels of proinflammatory and metabolic markers of inflammation and pulmonary inflammation. These are major inflammatory mediators and markers of inflammatory lung injury in patients with catastrophic acute respiratory distress syndrome, which is a primary consequence of COVID-19.

Ref link: https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.12.18.20248483v1